Speaking 101

Over the past several posts, I’ve shared excerpts from a workshop I did on basic public speaking skills. In effect, I’ve created a mini-course in how to develop your first speech. To make it easy for you, I’ve organized these video excerpts into an eight-week course in basic public speaking. Enjoy!

How to use this mini course:

The information is structured as an eight-week course, with one module per week. Although it is possible to go through this material all in one day, I don’t recommend it. Take in one module at a time to allow yourself to absorb each piece of the overall public speaking puzzle. Do one module a day (or week) and you’ll be fine!

The core of each module is the Lesson video or videos. Each video is around 2 to 4 minutes long, so they won’t take up much of your time. Everything else is supplementary and there to enhance the lesson. They are there as additional supplementary material for you to use if you want to.

Tools you’ll need to get the most out of this course

  • A spiral notebook to journal about your experience and write your assignments
  • A digital video recording device to record your presentation for self-critique.

Would you like help moving through this course?

Carma Spence, author of Public Speaking Super Powers, is available for private and group training in public speaking. She can help you through these modules and provide you with feedback and accountability. Contact her for more information.
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Public Speaking Tip #6: Present Your Speech Well

Here is the second installment of excerpts from For the Love of Public Speaking, a 27-minute introduction to Toastmasters I produced during a Television Production Workshop at Santa Rosa Junior College in 1994. This week I cover “Presentation.”
 

 
The information in this video is targeted to people who are just starting in Toastmasters. But the basis of what I’m saying applies to anyone who wants to make public speaking a part of their business, as well.
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Five Tips for Giving Oral Presentations

presentations1. Use simple, easy to understand visuals.
Visuals often help make a concept clearer than mere words can. This is especially true of difficult to understand and/or visualize scientific or technical information.

2. Use clear and natural body language.
Often, if you can “show what you mean” via body language — hand gestures, body stance — it can make a concept more clear. It is very important, however, that the gestures seem natural and not forced. Also, using body language can put you and your audience at ease. When people are more relaxed, they can convey and understand scientific and technical information more easily.

3. Use easy to hear language, make it more conversational.
Many times words that are perfectly understandable when read, can be misunderstood when heard. Also, a person who is reading can always go back and read an unclear sentence, however, when someone is talking, they can’t go back and listen to the sentence again. This is even more important when you are trying to convey difficult information.
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