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Category Archives: The Power of Voice

Top 10 Ways to Butcher Your Presentation and How to Avoid Them

Arvee RobinsonBy Featured Speaker Arvee Robinson

1. Getting there late.
Walking frantically into a room full of people who have been waiting for you to arrive can be an embarrassing situation. Unless you are a magician, you might as well turn around and leave. It would take a miracle to get this audience to forget the inconvenience you have caused them. They probably have already passed judgment on you, deciding you’re an inconsiderate speaker rather than a viable expert in your field. Make the extra effort to arrive at least 1/2 hour before the event begins.

2. Apologizing before you start.
Starting off your presentation with “Uh, I’m sorry that I . . .” is the quickest, most assured way to lose your audience’s attention and leave them cold. Remember, YOU are the expert and true experts have nothing to be sorry for. The audience doesn’t care if you have a cold, woke up late, got caught in traffic, or tripped on a banana skin. All they care about is what information you’re going to give them that will benefit them in the shortest amount of time. Remember Love Story-“Love means never having to say you’re sorry.”
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Color in Public Speaking Does Not Refer to What You Are Wearing

Nancy DanielsBy Featured Speaker Nancy Daniels

One of the requirements for dynamic speaking, whether it is at the lectern or just in normal conversation, is to be expressive when you talk. This is known as color and refers to your vocal variety, facial expression, and body language. All three elements work hand-in-hand to make your delivery more interesting.

There are some who are colorful in conversation but freeze at the lectern. All color drains from both their face and their voice as they hastily spit out a pile of words, hoping to get the ordeal over with as soon as possible. And, there are others who lack color in speaking whether they are addressing an audience or just talking to a friend or family member.

Why is color so important? Because without it, you are boring. It is difficult enough to keep your listeners’ attention. Our ability to focus for any great length of time has decreased considerably. With the overwhelming amount of visual and aural stimuli with which we are constantly bombarded, this should come as no surprise. Did you know that the amount of time spent on a website page is less than 40 seconds?
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The Power of Vocal Variety

The Power of Vocal VarietyNo one wants to listen to a presentation delivered in a monotone. Tone, pitch and volume all convey meaning … and they help keep the audience engaged. That’s the power of vocal variety.

But, like all powers, vocal variety is a tool that can be used to both make your presentation more powerful … or just plane confusing. It is the finesse with which you use vocal variety that can make or break your speech.

Use too little and your audience falls asleep.

Use too much and your audience wants to run away from you!

Here are some tips for making vocal variety work for you:

Volume:
How loudly or softly you say things adds emphasis. For example, when you suddenly say something louder than the rest of your presentation, you wake up the audience. You startle them into paying attention.

Lower your volume and you make them lean in toward you to take it all in. Lowering volume can also have a calming effect.
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Vocal Variety – Spice of the Speech

vocal varietyIt has been shown that we are more likely to be affected by voice of a speaker than by the words spoken. It is how the speech is delivered, rather than what is said, this is most important.

There are five basic ways you can vary your voice when you speak. The variables are volume, pitch, rate, quality and character. Let’s cover these individually.

Volume.
How loudly or softly you say your words makes a difference in the emotion or impact of those words. For example, if I was to say, “I am very angry” with a soft voice, I’m not as likely to give you the impression that I’m angry, as I would if I said the same thing loudly.
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