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Monthly Archives: January 2011

Public Speaking Tip #7: Develop Good Presence

Here is the third and final installment of excerpts from For the Love of Public Speaking, a 27-minute introduction to Toastmasters I produced during a Television Production Workshop at Santa Rosa Junior College in 1994. This week I cover “Presentation.”
 

 
The information in this video is targeted to people who are just starting in Toastmasters. But the basis of what I’m saying applies to anyone who wants to make public speaking a part of their business, as well.
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The Benefits of Using Humor in Your Speech

laughterI’ll be the first to tell you that humor is a tricky thing. You see, one person’s humor is another person’s “what were you thinking?” But, if you can weave some humor into your speech that gets the audience laughing; that is appropriate to your topic; and that doesn’t offend anyone, you can reap many of the following benefits.

Put the audience at ease.
A relaxed audience is one that will be more present and available to take in the information you want to present.

Create a connection.
Humor often makes the speaker more approachable and likable. This helps them hear your message more readily.
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Learn the Dynamic Power of Persuasive Speaking and Watch As Your Sales Skyrocket!

Arvee RobinsonBy Featured Speaker Arvee Robinson

Great speakers seem to present to an audience effortlessly, without a drop of sweat on their brow, not a flutter in their voice, and no bungled words. They hold us in awe, captivate us, leave us hanging on their every word and easily persuade us to respond to anything they ask of us.

If you are one of these great speakers, you’re one of a tiny percentage of people who are not afraid to speak in public, one of the top four fears Americans acknowledge.

The tragedy is that, for most of us, our careers or businesses call upon us to speak every single day, to clients, suppliers, the Boss, fellow colleagues and conference delegates. Because we have no idea how our words and nonverbal communications impact our audience, we lose sales and fail to attract new clients or earn referrals.
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Public Speaking Tip #6: Present Your Speech Well

Here is the second installment of excerpts from For the Love of Public Speaking, a 27-minute introduction to Toastmasters I produced during a Television Production Workshop at Santa Rosa Junior College in 1994. This week I cover “Presentation.”
 

 
The information in this video is targeted to people who are just starting in Toastmasters. But the basis of what I’m saying applies to anyone who wants to make public speaking a part of their business, as well.
(more…)

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Don’t Underestimate Your Audience

audience clappingOn Thursday, I had the opportunity to see Dan Vega speak at a one-day business bootcamp. There were several things he said that really stood out to me, but today I’m going to talk about this one:

“So many speakers underestimate the audience.”

In the context of what he was saying, he was suggesting that audiences are often more intelligent or well educated than speakers give them credit for. But there are so many other ways that, I believe, speakers often underestimate their audience.

For one, many believe that the audience is there to find fault in your presentation and pick you apart. This leads many to suffer from a fear of speaking. Of course, hostile audiences do exist, but I think on average … and from the experiences shared by many of the featured speakers I’ve interviewed for this project … most audiences want you to succeed.
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Feedback to Make Them Love You

Lily IatridisBy Featured Speaker Lily Iatridis

Recently I wrote about using strategic questioning to get your audience creatively engaged during your speaking event. But what comes after they answer your questions? That’s also an integral part to relationship building with your audience, especially with public speaking. The answer is qualitative feedback.

Most of the time, when the audience responds to a seminar leader’s question, the feedback they get is something generic, like “That’s good,” “Good!” “Great!” and so on. With that type of feedback, opportunities for relationship building are lost. What does “good” really mean? It’s like attaching a moral value to the response: Good v. Bad. It doesn’t really mean anything. If that’s the only type of feedback that you ever give, it’ll slowly kill audience participation during your live event. You, the seminar leader, will soon come across as if you don’t really care or value the contributions.

You’ve got to vary your feedback and make it genuine. This will inspire trust and more participation from your audience.
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Public Speaking Tip #5: Choose Content You’re Interested In

Back in 1994, I took a Television Production Workshop at Santa Rosa Junior College. To pass the class, I only needed to create one 7-minute video. I ended up producing a 27-minute introduction to Toastmasters, a quick skit video and a music video. What can I say, I think big!

Anyway, this week’s video tip … and the next two … is excerpted from For the Love of Public Speaking, the longest project I did in that class.
 

 
The information in this video is targeted to people who are just starting in Toastmasters, which is why I mention a short presentation time and a wide selection of topics. But the basis of what I’m saying applies to anyone who wants to make public speaking a part of their business, as well.
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